Category / Chickens

Chickens Health Issues

Dealing with a Sick Chicken

Every morning when I let the girls out, I always watch them for a few minutes.  Mostly to make sure everyone is feeling good, happy and acting themselves.  I pick each of them up almost on a daily basis.  Just to check-in.  About 2 months ago, Tilly was not acting her normal self.

Tilly seemed sad.  Her head and tail were both down.  She was sluggish and not pecking at the ground like everyone else.  I continued to watch her for a few days and she became worse.  She started sneezing, breathing like she had something stuck in her throat and had a runny nose.  Tilly was definitely ill and not getting better.  I became worried for a few reasons.  First, she was our head hen.  We like her in that order.  She keeps the girls calm and when she free ranges, she never goes too far away from the coop.  Second, she was just a baby.  She had so much more life to live.  Third,  we were raising them entirely organically.  This meant no medications.  Fourth, she was a beloved pet.

Initally I read all my chicken references on hand.  The diagnosis was still unclear.  Cape Cod being small and rather rural, I was unsure that I could even locate a veterinarian with chicken experience.  After making a few phone calls, I was able to reach a vet that does treat birds and has started to spread over into the realm of chickens.  She was about a half hour away.

I caught Tilly, and put her in a Pampers box.  She was quiet the entire way.  While checking in and waiting in the waiting room, she only wanted to be held in my lap.  She nuzzled into my arm and closed her eyes.  This was not my Tilly.  Finally, we saw the vet.  After her exam, it was not entirely clear as to what was going on.  Therefore, the vet decided to deworm the entire flock and give Tilly an antibiotic for a respiratory infection.

Tilly was on the antibiotic for 5 days.  By day 4 she seemed to be getting better.  Afterwards though, I noticed that her crop became rather enlarged, soft and squishy.  After extensive internet research, I figured out that Tilly developed a sour crop from the antibiotics she was on for her respiratory infection.  I subsequently treated her with Nystatin for 10 days.

Tilly’s crop was distended for about 1 month.  It has since then made a full recovery.  This is the point at which I started giving the chickens the weekly yogurt and adding apple cider vinegar to their water supply.  I feel that both are adding to the overall digestive health of our chickens.

What about raising the chickens entirely organically?  Well sometimes life takes those unexpected turns for the worse.  If I hadn’t given her the antibiotics which did violate organic chicken raising, then we would not have Tilly.  The antibiotics saved Tilly for that I am sure.  We still have our chickens on an organic feed.  So our eggs will have an organic component.  I’m just glad that Tilly is still with us.

Chickens Health Issues

Yogurt Mondays!

Did you know that chickens love yogurt??  It is such a fabulous food for them.  I feed them plain organic yogurt with live and active cultures. ( It is important that they don’t get any extra sugar.)  When they see me coming you should see the commotion.  It is crazy!  There is so much yogurt flinging and they get it everywhere.  Some of the added benefits of adding yogurt to your chicken’s diet include calcium for egg laying, promotion of a healthy digestive system and assisting in the balance of the “good” gut bacteria.  Next time when your girls seem bored…try some yogurt.

Chickens Stories from Our Nest

Beautiful Fall Sunday

 

Our 2 black silkies
We went out to the Wellfleet Oyster Festival today.  We took some pictures along the way by the Massachusetts Audubon Sanctuary in Wellfleet.
Before I left today, I put a pumpkin in the girls run.  Here are some pictures of the girls exploring the pumpkin.  So far they have only eaten through the top.  I can’t wait to see what they do when they get to the seeds!  I think we all enjoyed the weather today, especially the chickens.  It has been getting so cold in the mornings and at night.  That reminds me…I need to get moving with the winterization before my top choices sell out.

 

Feathers peering and pecking at the pumpkin

 

 

Tilly, Oyster Cracker and Sunshine

 

Blackfish Creek Marsh

Chickens Stories from Our Nest

Do they understand me?

I really do believe so.  Before I had chickens, I wasn’t really sure how smart they were.  I thought that they were cute and all and had come to the conclusion that would be enough for me to start raising them.   All the girls seem smart.  Tilly knows her name.  When they are free ranging outside and I do not see them immediately, I just have to call her name and she comes out from where she is.  It is so adorable because as head hen, wherever Tilly goes, the others follow.  They all run to me so fast.  Sometimes giddy in fact.  But contrary to belief, they are not looking for food, they are sometimes just looking for love.

Yep,  my chickens love to be loved.  They each take their turns.  Depending on their personalities, some like to be held and snuggled like little babies and some just love a good stroking of their sides, back and underbellies.  You may even think that I am crazy, but I love the way they smell too.  They smell warm, sweet and comforting.  Next time you are with your girls, give them a smell.  I promise it will warm your heart.

The girls also recognize their favorite treats.  I can put many different ones inside of the run but they always like broccoli, grapes and strawberries the best.  At first, I thought that it was the red coloring of the strawberry that they were attracted to but the other treats proved me wrong.

The girls also can spot danger.  Oyster Cracker always serves as the lookout.  When she sees something out of the corner of her eye, she lets out almost a low growl of a dog.  The chickens stand perfectly still and stop whatever they are doing.  I can pick them up easily when they are doing this because they are just like lawn statues.

They have their own language.  I am trying to decode it but they all understand it.  Some of their favorite chicken lines express happiness, I found something, don’t do that to me, come here, follow me, where are you,  let’s snuggle.

I believe that some of these things are born into them and they just being chickens know how to do these things, but I truly do believe that they experience emotions, have a pretty high level of intelligence and have social rules and orders.

Chickens Stories from Our Nest

Home Sweet Home

So, as I am sure many of you have searched and searched for the perfect coop for your girls.  I did too!  I spent months searching and deciding whether I should order plans, concoct one from various designs to build or just order something.

Initially, I ordered a small coop from http://www.mypetchicken.com/.  However, it was soon apparent that it was rapidly being out grown.  I also found that I had to replace the cheaply made hardware if I was going to protect the chickens from any predators.  This first coop is now used as a nursery as well as a place to quarantine anyone who doesn’t feel well or is injured from the rest of the flock.

It took me about 3 months of intensive searching to find ultimately what I believe to be the perfect chicken coop.  A man named Dan Cohen from Michigan has a company online called
www.greenchickencoop.com

He makes the coops from scratch with really great sturdy materials.  The coop itself is really terrific.  It takes only 5 minutes to clean out.   The floor inside has industrial grade linoleum that makes even the most caked on doo doo scrape right off!  When the eggs come, the handy little door opens to reveal 3 nest boxes.  I added the extra windows in the front with plexiglass slide-outs in warm weather and a small plexiglass vent on the side.  Dan truly was extremely thoughtful in creating this home for the girls.

The run comes in 3’x 6′ sections.  You can order them seperately.  I ordered 3 sections to create a 6’x9′ run.  Just perfect for 6-8 standard size breeds.  All the screening on both the coop and the run are 1/2 inch hardware cloth as well.  Often during the middle of a beautiful day, I find the girls lounging in their house.  They love it.

The area where we live on Cape Cod is known for predators.  We have racoons, foxes, coyotes, fisher cats, oppossum and owls.  I purchased additional hardware cloth and dug a 12″ trench around the run.  I buried the wire around the entire run and folded the top into the run area as well.  I hope this will be enough protection.  Time will tell.

Chickens Stories from Our Nest

And then there were 5

In the early days, our favorite little chicken was Peanut.  Peanut was always so curious; the first to come to us, discover the newest addition placed into his tiny 2’x2′ world.  Peanut always needed more care than the others in the beginning too.  Peanut was the one that I wasn’t sure would survive.  Peanut seemed the weakest of them all on that first day, droopy and wobbly.  Over time, our love for Peanut blosssomed.  The kids loved holding Peanut.  Peanut would snuggle into our chests and sit for time on end.  Sometimes, we would even hear a pleasure trill!

Peanut is a Buff Silkie Bantam.  At http://www.mypetchicken.com/ you can pay extra to have your chickens sexed.  Many people do not want rooster for the various reasons. Most people will pay extra just to ensure that they will get only females. However, silkies are very difficult to sex.  Most hatcheries don’t even attempt this.  However, http://www.mypetchicken.com/ does!  I paid extra for all females including the Silkie Bantams.

It wasn’t until about week 10 that I had my suspicions.  Peanut soon began to grow so fast.  Peanut’s waddle and comb were getting huge.  I read on the internet that you can be fooled by Silkies, that they often will look like one sex but turn out to be the other.  The other disturbing thing was that anytime I need to hold Peanut, I would be pecked.  At first the pecking was gentle, but as time went on it really could hurt depending on how you were gotten.

One day, early in the morning, my husband was leaving for work and I was in the garage getting their food and I heard it.  From inside the coop, a pathetic, “OOO, OOOO, DOO.”  Was I imagining things?  Then we heard it again.  I could not be sure who it was coming from.  Finally, after about a week I realized that it was Peanut.  Peanut was a rooster.

Over the next few weeks, Peanut turning out to be a rooster was becoming even more evident with each day that passed.  Again, I did research about keeping a rooster.  Currently, in our town, there are no regulations about keeping chickens or rooster.  Thank goodness for that.  I was just worried about his aggressive tendencies and our 2 little kids.  My husband and I decided that our rooster needed a new home.  I emailed many local farms on a whim and a farm off Cape about 40 minutes away agreed to take him.  There he will have about 100 hens to himself.  Oh, what a rooster’s dream!

It has now been about a week since we rehomed Peanut.  I do miss him so.  I miss his silly little antics, his trying to bully the hens, his curiosity, his gorgeous blue earlobes, and even his warm little body.  I do know that we made the right choice and he should be much happier it is just hard to say goodbye.  Just like a baby, he was mine since he was one day old.

Chickens Coop Care Seasonal Care Stories from Our Nest

Colder Days, Planning for Winter

This will be my first Winter with the girls.  Cape Cod doesn’t get too cold, but it has really gotten me to thinking about the coop and run set up as well as freezing waterers and nasty weather ahead.  As a hobbist chicken raiser, we are not doing this on a very large scale.   Our maximum flock size will mostlikely be about 12 girls, 6 of those being bantams.  It is difficult to even find small feeders and waterers that are not hobbist size for adult chickens and most smaller versions are for little chicks.

My coop is 3’x4′ and the run is 6’x9′.  I am currently using the plastic Little Giant 3 pound feeder.  I have placed it upon 2 bricks elevating it above the pine shavings in the coop.  The waterer is outside in the run.  That too is a Little Giant 2 gallon galvanized metal waterer. 

That being said, I am now looking into making the winter easy for the girls and for me too.  There are numerous options from heated pet bowls, plastic waterers with an area to plug and extension cord into, as well as a metal heater base for the waterers to sit upon.  The reviews are mixed on all choices.  Thus, here in lies the difficulties.  I guess this conversation will have to be continued…

Chickens Stories from Our Nest

When they were chicks

Here are the two Buff Orpingtons when they were 3 days old.  Still as curious as ever.   It is hard to believe that they look like full grown chickens within about 6 weeks.  They are on an organic feed from Vermont.  Who know there were so many options with the feed; mash, crumbles, pellets.  Our girls at 16 weeks are now on layer pellets.  They seem to be less messy and the girls don’t mind.

The Austrolorp, Tilly, is the head hen.  She has been at the pecking order since day 1.  It is amazing to see them grow.  She is a sweet gentle natured girl.  She is not the biggest anymore, but that does not seem to matter.  They all have unique personalities and funny quirks.  I never thought that I would ever love a chicken let alone all 6 of them.

Chickens Stories from Our Nest

In the beginning…

I became serious about raising chickens this past winter.  I really always was intrigued by them.  I however, was not sure what the necessary requirements were. Like any typical type A person, I read and read and read.  Finally, after talking to numerous people.  I ordered the girls from  http://www.mypetchicken.com/ .   I really had to wait a long time.  I ordered them in February but decided to have them delivered in June after school let out for the summer.  I did this for a few reasons.  One being that I had no where to put them.  Two, that I heard how quickly they grow and did not want my children to miss out.

I can clearly remember the post office frantically leaving 2 messages on my answering machine that day.  It was late June and hot.  I went as quickly as I could to the post office and when I arrived I was handed a peeping cardboard box.  It was about 12″x6″x6″.  I drove so carefully talking to my box all the way in my best Mama hen impersonation. 

When I arrived home, I gently removed the lid and found huddled in the corner six tiny day old chicks.  Eager to meet their new family,  we taught them how to drink and eat and placed them under the heat lamp in soft pine shavings.  We had just met the newest members of our family:  Tilly, Oyster Cracker, Sunshine, Chocolate, Feathers and Peanut Butter.