Chickens Stories from Our Nest

It’s Tough Being Broody: An Update on Tilly

As Tilly and the girls are safely locked up for the night, I find myself here, in front of the computer sitting and feeling very loved from all of your prayers, words of encouragement and compassion for Tilly.  Thank you.

Just like in pregnancies, some are easier and some are more difficult.  Some women carry their babies beautifully through all nine months.  They barely gain any weight.  They seem to be glowing and they have easy deliveries.  I sort of liken this to Dolly, one of our Silkie hens.  Dolly is always broody and she is very good at it.  She has it down to a schedule and she handles it with such ease.  It is just as though her body is meant to handle this natural process.

Then there are others like myself included, who experience more difficult pregnancies.  We have huge amounts of weight gain, reflux, leg cramps, swelling, medical complications and difficult deliveries.   You might say that this is like Tilly.  I don’t think Tilly’s body is happy with her mind’s decision to be broody.

Yesterday, Tilly was clearly under the weather.  She seemed miserable sitting in her nesting box with her head hung low and her spirits dampened.  Late that afternoon, I had removed her from the nesting box and looked her over.  I felt her abdomen for any eggs. I checked for mites and lice.  I examined her crop.  Nothing appeared out of the ordinary, but it is very difficult to remain objective in a situation like this when your heart is involved and your chicken is ill.  Around 4:30pm in the afternoon, I decided to run things by our vet.  We both mutually made the decision to bring Tilly in for an examination the next day.  Of course, weeks prior, I had volunteered for a whale watch at my son’s school scheduled for the morning.

This morning, it was Chicken Grandma to the rescue.  She brought Tilly to the vet early this morning and I participated in seeing Minke and humpback whales with my son.  When we arrived on shore, we raced to the car to pick up Tilly.  The vet and her staff had a chance to examine her and keep her for most of the day under observation.  We knew she was in good hands and our fingers were crossed for good news.

When we arrived, we were met with good news.  Tilly is not egg bound.  Her oil gland is working properly.  She has no mites or lice and her crop seems to be functioning normally.  She is worm free.  Tilly, for now, seems to just be having a difficult time being broody.  When they brought her out to us, we gave her a huge hug.  We were all so happy to be reunited.

It is never easy waiting for motherhood.  I feel badly for her the way it is now; with no fertile eggs, it can never be.  Tomorrow, I have a planned visit to my dear friend’s farm.  I might just see if she has any fertile eggs for Tilly.  Sometimes, it’s the reward that makes these tough times in life worth the difficult journey.

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