Tag / egg bound

Chickens Eggs Health Issues

Tilly’s Feat

This morning around 9am I found Tilly sitting in the right nesting box. Sitting in the neighboring nesting boxes were Dolly and Feathers.  Dolly and Feathers are both broody.  I quickly checked beneath all of them for eggs.  There were none, so I went on my errands for the morning.

Chickens DIY Projects Eggs

So You Want To Raise Backyard Chickens: 5 of a 5 Part Series

Well the flock will be one year old in June.  We have survived our first Northeast Winter and we just just hatched our own eggs.  I think it is now time that I write the final chapter in my guide to raising chickens. I’ve touched upon these topics now and then with some of the blogs over the past few months.  For some of these topics, I am going to refer to previous posts as added references for you.  I am by no means an expert in keeping chickens.  I am also positive that I am not going to cover all the ins and outs of keeping backyard chickens.  However, I do know what I have discovered along our journeys and I am happy to share them with you.

Chickens Health Issues

Tips for Chickens from Our Coop to Yours

Well it has been seven month since we started raising chickens.  I thought that I would share a few tips that I have learned along the way since raising chickens.  They might make a difference in how you do things too.

1.  Add 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar to 1 gallon of water that they drink.  This helps to promote gastrointestinal and crop health.

2.  Mix food grade diatomaceous earth (DE) into their feed.  Approximately 2%.  This helps to keep parasites down and also provides the chickens with extra vitamins and minerals.  This also keeps pest from living in the chicken’s feeders and eating their food.

3.  Buy a Pest Pistol from www.treatsforchickens.com.  Fill it with DE and blast the nooks and crannies of your clean coop.  This will keep down any mites or bugs that like to bother your chickens.  You can also dust your chickens’ bottoms and under their wings too. 

4.  If your hen ends up with an egg stuck in her vent, gently coat the area with Vaseline and coax the egg out.  If the egg breaks inside, then you will need to go to the vet.  It can lead to egg peritonitis.

5.  If your hen has a prolapsed vent (the inner portion of the vent is sticking out), treat it like a hemorrhoid.  Put a mixture of Neosporin and Preparation H on it.  Keep her in a warm dark place and limit her amount of food, not water, until the vent returns to normal.

6.  In winter or a wet spring while cleaning the coop, toss the dirty shavings and straw from the coop into the run.  This helps dry out wet areas and the chickens will turn it into compost very quickly for use in your garden.

I hope you enjoyed these tips.  Do you have any to share?