Tag / candy board

Beekeeping DIY Hive Maintainance

Seasonal Recipes for Feeding Honeybees

As beekeepers, there come times when we need to feed our bees or offer them up reserves to help them get through dearths and winter. New colonies should be fed so that they can quickly build out new comb for the queen to lay and for them to store their foraged pollen and nectar.  Existing colonies also require feeding, especially a back up method to help ensure their winter survival. Today I thought that I would place these all recipes in one place for you to easily find them.

Beekeeping DIY Hive Maintainance

DIY: Winter Beehive Quilting Box

Today I want to share with you how to make a quilting box for your hive. As a beekeeper you already know that excess moisture in the hive is never a good thing, especially in the cooler weather when the bees are more prone to harm and death from living in a wet environment. During the winter the bees are still active in their cluster. They keep a small bit of brood alive and focus on over wintering their queen. Despite the outside temperatures, the center of the cluster must remain 95 degrees Fahrenheit. The bees do this by taking turns on the outside of the cluster and flapping their wings to generate heat. During this process their warm air mixes with surrounding colder air and naturally creates condensation in the hive. Usually this moisture collects on the lid of the inner cover and turns into water droplets. Those droplets then drip down into the hive, creating a condition incompatible with life.

Beekeeping Bees DIY Hive Maintainance

A Winter Beehive Candy Board

Honeybees work.  They work all spring and summer to store up enough pollen and honey for their colony to survive the winter.  However, sometimes, their best efforts are not enough and they can end up starving to death if their supplies run out.  As you have read, in the early spring and late fall when the nectar and pollen supplies are low, we feed our honey bees sugar syrup as a supplement.  They can take this honey syrup or leave it.  The choice is up to them and it provides them with access to extra food if need be.  However, sugar syrup and freezing temperatures do not agree, thus those keeping bees in colder climates must feed their bees another way.I have researched this very topic quite a bit.  The good news is that there are options.  You can make fondant that sits on top of the frames, that they bees can eat as needed.  You can use the Mountain Camp Method with some sugar poured directly on newspaper, or you can create a candy board.  To me the choice is clear.  The candy board once made requires little maintenance   It is easy to refill.  It can hold up to 15 pounds of sugar.  The sugar itself, helps to absorb moisture and humidity from the hive.  It is accessible to the bees from all the frames in the upper deep.  It does not require the beekeeper to open the hives frequently to check and replenish the food.