Chickens Stories from Our Nest

Saying Goodbye

Well, sometimes the best laid plans can change.

After I finished posting yesterday, my friend with the farm called and asked when I was going to bring my chickens over!  Her ears must have been ringing!  She also asked about Chocolate and if I was ready to bring him too.

 

Past Winter, reminding Chocolate who is boss by cradling him on his back.

I went through the motions almost trying to numb the reality that today was going to be the day that Chocolate would be rehomed.  Chocolate became very symbolic to me.  He helped me advocate with the town to allow individuals to keep backyard roosters.  He graces the cover on the Agricultural Commission brochure that I helped to create.  He also served his flock well, protecting and warning his girls from danger.  He is the father of our first brood.

I caught him and gave him the most love that I could.  As tough as it was, I placed him in the box.  I also decided that Meesha our little Silkie girl who has been broody for over 2 months was going to need a change of environment if she was going to survive.  Sitting in the nesting box had made her very thin.  As much as I could, I intervened but it was just not enough to break her broody spell.  Next, I took all of the chicks from the brooder except for one of Dolly and Chocolate’s chicks and Dottie Speckles.  I placed them in another box.

We drove over to the farm and the little Silkie Chicks went right into the run with my friend’s twenty or so baby silkies of mixed ages.  Soon they blended in so well and seemed so happy that they were no longer decipherable.  They were happy.  Next Chocolate and Meesha were placed in their very own cage.  I had done it.  Chocolate could no longer try and harm my daughter.  Meesha would be nursed back to health and the babies were now in a large chicken daycare waiting to find new homes.

Later that evening, Dottie Speckles and our little Silkie newly named Fifi joined the larger flock under the cover of the night.  I placed them in the nesting box with Dolly.

Photo Credit:  GLC

Hello friends, welcome! Follow along on our chicken, beekeeping, gardening, crafting and cooking adventures from Cape Cod.

  • Oooh so difficult. You did good.

  • Aww..only a mother could give them a better home..and they think of you as their momma.
    Well Done my friend.

    Hugs Cindy from Rick-Rack and Gingham

  • Oh, dear. I'm sure it was an extremely difficult thing to do. My heart aches for you. But I know you did the right thing. And it sounds like Chocolate is going to be very, very happy in his new home.

    Raising chickens can be a joy and a heart break. (((hugs))) to you.

  • Thank you so much Lauren, Cindy and Basic Living. I am so touched by your kindness. Your comments mean the world to me and I am truly so very lucky to have you all in my life. Thank you too for the hugs! I really needed them 🙂 Have a beautiful Mother's Day weekend.

  • About broody birds, putting ice under them usually gets them out of the box

  • Thanks Qing, I've heard that before, but I always thought that seemed a little mean.

  • Sounds as if you did what any good mama would do in your situation. Hard, but necessary… Heres to harmony in your Hen House from here on out!
    Deb

  • Thanks so much Deb and thanks for having such a great hop! I can't wait to check them out 🙂 Have a wonderful weekend–Melissa

  • Ha! I just read your last post so I would know what was going on in this post. So you must disregard my comment because you do not need any help knowing how to do the night time undercover maneuver.

  • Hi Brenda! Any advice is ALWAYS welcome here:). I'm learning everyday. Thank you.

  • It's not so bad compared to what happens if they're broody for too long. Eventually I guess they will learn not to be as broody.

  • Qing, you definitely have a point!